Tag Archive | Etiquette

Accepting Apologies

This is part 2 to last week’s Making Apologies post. This week we’ll learn what to say when we accept these apologies.

To accept an apology without reservation:

Ce n’est pas grave. | It doesn’t matter.


Je t’en prie. / Je vous en prie. | Don’t mention it./Forget it.


Il n’y a pas de quoi. | That’s alright.


Ne t’en fais pas. / Ne vous en faites pas. | Don’t worry.


N’en parlons plus. | Let’s forget it.


To accept an apology, but stress that the fault must not happen again:

Ça va, pourvu que tu ne recommences pas. (especially to children) | That’s alright, just don’t do it again.


Je vous excuse, mais vous devriez faire mieux attention à l’avenir. | I forgive you, but you should take more care in the future.


Espérons du moins que cela ne se reproduira pas. | Let’s hope it does not happen again.


Some less formal and more colloquial responses:

Pas de problème ! | No problem!


Il n’y a pas de mal ! | No harm!


Pas de soucis ! No worries!


Very short post this week. I try to bring you guys enough content in each post, so I apologise for the brevity of this post! Look at how I’m apologising on an apologies post (not intentional!). Now what would you say in response? En français. 🙂

A la prochaine…

Courtney

Making Apologies

In French, as in most languages, there are set formulae for making your apologies, and accepting those apologies of someone else.

Apologizing to Friends/Close Colleagues

Simplest form of an apology:

Oh, pardon ! | Sorry!


Je m’excuse ! | My apologies! / I’m sorry!


Je suis désolé(e) ! | I’m really sorry!

Slightly more elaborate ways of apologising and admitting responsibility:

C’est ma faute. Excuse-moi. | It’s my fault. Sorry.


Je m’en veux beaucoup. | I’m really cross with myself for it.


J’espère que tu ne m’en veux pas / ne m’en voudras pas. | I hope you’re not too upset with me.


Je suis désolé(e) de t’avoir dérangé. | I’m really sorry to have disturbed you.

There are ways to apologise and also suggest that you are not entirely to blame. You would use “Je suis désolé(e)” and one of the following examples:

Je ne l’ai pas fait exprès. | I didn’t do it on purpose/deliberately.


Je ne pouvais pas faire autrement. | I had to./There was nothing else I could do.


J’essayais simplement de vous aider. | I was only trying to help you.


Je n’avais pas le choix. | I didn’t have a choice.


More formal apologies in conversation:

Brief apology:

  • Oh, pardonnez-moi ! (ex: if you accidentally bumped into someone or stepped on their foot) | Oh, I’m sorry!
  • Excusez-moi ! (ex: when you’ve done something wrong) | I’m sorry. / My apologies.
  • C’est moi le coupable. | It’s my fault. / I’m to blame.

Come back next week for part two of this post, “Accepting Apologies”. As always, if you have a request or a suggestion, feel free to leave a comment and I will be happy to help. 🙂 Have a great week, everyone!

A la prochaine…

Courtney

Etiquette – French Dining

Etiquette – French Dining

A first etiquette post! For those of you who have never dined in a restaurant in France and are planning on it in the future, please take a look at these phrases to use while dining in France.

If you didn’t know, dining in France is an experience and is quite different than dining in any other country. Just like anywhere, always always always remember your manners!

Je voudrais une table pour ____ personne(s).

  • I would like a table for ____ person/people.
  • May I have a table for ____ person/people.

La carte, s’il vous plaît.*

  • A menu, please.
  • May I have a menu, please?

*Never have I ever been to a restaurant in France that didn’t give me the menu straight away. But it’s always good to know the right way to ask, just in case.

Pourrais-j’avoir la carte boissons, s’il vous plaît ?

  • May I have the drink menu, please?
  • Could I have the drink menu, please?

Avez-vous des plats végétariens ?

  • Do you have vegetarian meals?

Un autre, s’il vous plaît.

  • One more, please.

Je voudrais une carafe d’eau.

  • I would like tap water.*

*You can also as for tap water the same way and use “tap water”. Most waiters know the phrase “tap water”. (You may also say plate (flat) as well, or even gaseuse (bubbly).)

Acceptez-vous les cartes de crédit ?

  • Do you accept credit cards?

C’était très bon !

  • It was very good!

L’addition, s’il vous plaît !*

  • Check, please!

*Restaurants in France, you always request your bill at the end of the mean when you are ready for it. The wait staff does not push the bill on you, it’s considered rude.

Enjoy your meals in France! Remember to always say s’il vous plaît and merci. And always, always remember to tip your waiter/waitress.

If you are curious about any other types of French etiquette, please don’t hesitate to request something!

Have a great week, everyone!

Merci à vous !

Courtney

For further reading, please head over to my fellow blogger’s posts on how to interact with a Parisian waiter, and what not to do in a French restaurant.

Happy reading!